Advisory Committee

The Nature Mapping Advisory Committee is composed of partner organization representatives. The board members bring local research and educational perspectives to the project.

Bryan Bedrosian


Brian Bedrosian

Bryan was born and raised just outside of Chicago, but moved up to Wisconsin to attend the University of Wisconsin – Stevens Point, where he began his interest in studying birds. While obtaining his undergraduate degree in Biology, he was always either researching raptors or fishing. After finishing, he and his wife, Emily, moved to Jackson Hole to work for the Teton Science Schools. Bryan quickly began volunteering with Craighead Beringia South finding raptor and raven nests and assisting with Red-tailed Hawk trapping for the satellite migration study. Working with CBS, Bryan continued his education at Arkansas State University and earned his master's degree in 2004 by studying the raven population of Jackson Hole. He has since continued working with CBS and is now Project Manager for the Avian Programs.

Amy Collett


Amy Collett

Amy has a Bachelor’s Degree in Wildlife Biology and Management from the University of Wyoming. She started her career spraying and mapping noxious weeds in Grand Teton National Park. Most of her past work experience however, has been in outdoor education. She worked as a naturalist in the Ohio State Parks, an Interpretative Park Ranger in Yellowstone National Park, education specialist for the Wyoming Game and Fish, wildlife guide for the Teton Science Schools’ Wildlife Expeditions, and her current position as education coordinator for the Teton County Weed and Pest. She loves working with the public, helping them to understand the dynamics of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. Amy also takes passion in leading the Teton County Wildlife and Habitat 4H club.


Aly Courtemanch, Board Co-Chair


Aly Courtemanch

Aly Courtemanch is the Habitat Biologist for the Jackson Region of the Wyoming Game & Fish Department. She is also currently working on completing her M.S. at the Wyoming Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit at the University of Wyoming, studying bighorn sheep seasonal habitat selection and impacts from winter backcountry recreation in the Teton Range. For the past 3 years, she has been coordinating this project with Grand Teton National Park, the Wyoming Game & Fish Department, Bridger-Teton National Forest and Caribou-Targhee National Forest. She grew up in central Maine and earned a B.S. degree from St. Lawrence University in Biology and Environmental Studies. While a student, she studied abroad in Kenya and later returned to conduct research on land cover change after livestock exclusion on a Maasai group ranch. She has contributed to rainforest mammal research in Panama and worked for several years in the Jackson area as a seasonal technician for Grand Teton National Park, the Wyoming Game & Fish Department and Craighead Beringia South with bison, black bears, elk, raptors and sage grouse. In her free time, Aly enjoys traveling, Nordic skiing, rock climbing and backcountry skiing with her partner, Forest.

Sarah Dewey

Sarah Dewey is currently a wildlife biologist at Grand Teton National Park, where her primary responsibility is management and monitoring of ungulate populations. Her research interests include understanding the dynamics of ungulate populations, carnivore-ungulate relationships, and ecology of northern goshawks. She has worked as a wildlife biologist for over 15 years for the US Forest Service and National Park Service throughout the west on endangered species conservation, sensitive species monitoring, and environmental impacts analyses. Before coming to Grand Teton National Park in 2003, Sarah worked for the US Forest Service as a district biologist on the Nez Perce and Bridger-Teton National Forests and as a Wildlife Technician on the Ashley National Forest in Utah. She received a bachelor's degree in geology and environmental studies from Colby College in Maine and a master's degree in Wildlife Biology from Colorado State University.


Natalie Fath, Board Co-Chair


Natalie Fath

Natalie is originally from the Midwest, where her love of wildlife and the outdoors was fueled exploring outside around Cincinnati, Ohio. She received a B.S. in Conservation Biology from Muskingum University and her M.S. in Environmental Sciences from Miami University. She began working with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service in 2007 at Seedskadee National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Wyoming where she helped launch the refuge’s visitor services program and oversaw the biological program. Currently, Natalie serves as the Visitor Center Manager at the Jackson Hole & Greater Yellowstone Visitor Center on the National Elk Refuge. She has contributed field time to tropical bird research in Belize and Costa Rica and cheetah research at the Cheetah Conservation Fund in Namibia. Natalie resides in Jackson where she enjoys camping, watching wildlife and hiking.


Mark Gocke


Mark Gocke

Mark fueled his interest in the outdoors as a youngster hunting and trapping along the banks of Beaver Creek in eastern Nebraska. After obtaining a Bachelor's degree in Wildlife Management from the University of Nebraska, he accepted a position as a Habitat Biologist with the Wyoming Game and Fish Department. In 1995, after stints in Wheatland and Sheridan, Mark moved into his current position with the Department as an Information and Education Specialist for the Jackson and Pinedale Regions. Mark enjoys wildlife photography and spending time outdoors with his wife, Lisa, and two children, Jonah and Emilie.


Lori Iverson

Lori leads the Public Use program on the National Elk Refuge. Long ago and far away, Lori earned a degree in Education from Michigan's Alma College. She enjoyed a 20-year teaching career, pairing her education profession with eight years of National Park Service seasonal work. She moved to Jackson, Wyoming in 1998, and in 2000 left full-time teaching to accept a permanent government position in Grand Teton National Park. There, Lori utilized her teaching experience by working as the area's first full-time fire education specialist. She joined the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service in June 2005 to oversee public use, visitor services, and public affairs on the National Elk Refuge. Lori resides in Jackson, Wyoming with her charming better half, Chris, who is a climbing ranger in Grand Teton National Park.


Steve Kilpatrick


Steve Kilpatrick

Steve is the Contract Director for the Conservation Research Center of the Teton Science Schools. He recently retired as the Habitat Biologist/Coordinator in the Jackson/Afton region for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department after a 33 year career. He was born and raised on a farm/ranch in Nebraska and received a B.S. in Biology and an M.S. in Wildlife Management from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. He worked as a big game and wetland habitat manager for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department in eastern Wyoming from 1978-1985. In 1986 he was transferred to the Jackson area where his primary focus areas are big game habitat related research, enhancement of big game winter ranges through the use of prescribed fire, maintaining/improving habitat effectiveness and general moose management. Steve was also involved with cooperative research projects on moose, elk and bighorn sheep in the Jackson area. He endeavors to bring folks of different backgrounds together and agree on common conservation and wildlife values.


Susan Marsh


Susan Marsh

Susan Marsh has lived in Jackson since 1988. She worked as the recreation and wilderness staff officer for the Bridger-Teton National Forest until retiring in 2010. She has degrees in geology and landscape architecture. In addition to serving on the Nature Mapping advisory board, she served on the Teton County Pathways task force for about 10 years and the board of the Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation for 13 years. She is active in the local bird club, Jackson Hole Writers Conference, and the Teton County chapter of the Wyoming Native Plant Society.


Kelly McCloskey

Kelly is the Vegetation Program Manager for Grand Teton National Park and the Co-President of the Jackson Hole Wildlife Foundation. After completing a bachelor’s degree in Geology at Brown University she was a park ranger in seven parks, including Rocky Mountain, Grand Canyon and Yosemite. In 1993 she left the park service and moved to Jackson, where she began research on aspen regeneration, then attended graduate school at Utah State University where her aspen work became a Master’s thesis. Kelly went on to receive a PhD from Utah State studying vegetation dynamics in the shrub-steppe, aspen, and conifer interface in southern Grand Teton National Park. She returned to work with the NPS in 2000. As the park’s vegetation ecologist she is engaged in vegetation mapping and monitoring, noxious weed management, shrub-steppe, whitebark pine, and wetland restoration projects and increasing awareness of the impact of human activities on vegetation.


Kerry Murphy

Kerry received this Bachelor and Master of Science Degrees in Wildlife Biology at the University of Montana in 1980 and 1983, respectively, and his Ph.D. at the University of Idaho in Forestry, Range, and Wildlife Science in 1998. His Ph.D. focused on the ecology of cougars in Yellowstone National Park, including their predation on ungulates, and their interactions with other carnivores and humans. Kerry has worked with a variety of state, tribal, and federal agencies as a technician and wildlife biologist, and with numerous large and medium-sized carnivores in both a research and management context, including black bears, bobcats, Canada lynx, wolverines, and gray wolves. Kerry served as an endangered species and mid-sized carnivore biologist with the National Park Service, Yellowstone National Park, from 1998 to 2009. Currently, Kerry is a wildlife biologist employed by the Bridger-Teton National Forest in Jackson, Wyoming. In addition to the ecology of carnivores, Kerry has a broad interest in wildlife population and habitat management.


Susan Patla


Susan Patla

Susan works as the nongame biologist in the Jackson/Pinedale Region for Wyoming Game and Fish Department, a position she has held since 1999. As such, she is responsible for monitoring and managing regional populations of bald eagle, trumpeter swan, peregrine falcon, and other nongame bird and mammals species of conservation concern. Susan earned a B.A. from University of Michigan, and an M.S. degree from Idaho State for which she conducted a 5 year study of Northern Goshawk ecology on the Caribou-Targhee National Forest. She has also worked for the US Fish and Wildlife Service in Alaska, and as trip naturalist on bike and sailing trips in the western US and Baja California. She currently serves as chair of the Wyoming Bird Record Committee. Bird watching has been and remains one of her favorite past-times, and she believes that everyone’s life could be enriched by getting to know some of the birds that share our world.


Bert Raynes


Bert Raynes

Bert Raynes started life as an infant and grew to college age in Jersey City, New Jersey, back in the day. At that stage, a tabula rosa, he escaped to college, graduated as a chemical engineer, and married Meg. He worked in research and development of varied kinds, including water pollution control and became a conservationist on the side. Meg and he discovered birds and biology. Upon retirement, Raynes wrote bird books, a weekly nature newspaper column, and got to know wildlife biologists. He tries to learn about natural history then inform others. He is available by appointment.


Renee Seidler


Renee Seidler

Renee is originally from the Pacific Northwest. She received her B.S. in Molecular and Microbiology from Arizona State University and her M.S. in Wildlife Biology from Utah State University. She began working with the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) in 2003 and helped to launch their Wildlife and Energy Development project in the Upper Green River Basin, WY, in 2005. She has conducted behavioral and ecological research on coyotes, wolves, moose, pronghorn, and small mammals in Montana, Wyoming, and Colorado. She has also contributed field time to tropical bird research in Panama and hyena research in Kenya. Renee's area of expertise is in field design and research. She is currently the pronghorn project Field Leader for WCS. In their spare time, she and her partner David enjoy skiing, boating, cycling, and hiking with their dogs Nova and Luna.


Ben Wise


Ben Wise

Ben Wise was born and raised in Worland, WY and attended Sheridan College prior to transferring to  the University of Wyoming to complete both a B.S. in Range Management and a M.S. in Veterinary Sciences with an emphasis in Environmental Toxicology.  After graduating, Ben worked for the Wyoming Game and Fish Department at the Thorne-Williams Wildlife Disease Research Facility before being hired as the Terrestrial Habitat Biologist for the Green River Region.  In Early 2013 Ben was transferred to the Jackson Region as the Brucellosis-Feedground-Habitat Biologist.  Ben’s main focus in his current position is to work with WGFD, local land management agencies and landowners to reduce brucellosis prevalence in Northwest Wyoming and reduce the risk of transmission of the disease to livestock.  Ben is  actively involved with area wildlife managers to increase awareness of ongoing and emerging wildlife diseases and also works to improve disease sampling efforts throughout the Jackson Region.  In his free time, Ben enjoys traveling, hunting, fishing and exploring all that Wyoming has to offer.